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28
Nov
2022

Robot at Alexandra Hospital can take patients' vital signs

The Straits Times © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

A robotic nursing assistant called Florence hinted at a possible future where nurses were supported by robotic nursing assistants in the wards. Florence had successful trials in Alexandra Hospital (AH), where it took vital signs of patients at their bedside. The robot could identify patients by scanning their wrist tag or with its artificial intelligence-based image recognition software before taking their vital signs using its camera, sensors, and pulse oximeter. The data goes directly into the National Electronic Health Record. 

AH project manager Mr Desmond Koh said that in calculating manpower savings, AH, which co-created Florence with NCS, Singtel’s technology services arm, looked at the time nurses spend on taking vital signs and delivering medication and items to patients. Ms Doreen Heng, AH’s assistant director of nursing, who was involved with the development of Florence, said the robot could free up nurses to do other value-added nursing tasks, including going on home visits. Prof Lawrence Ho, the director of the NUHS Centre for Innovation in Healthcare, said that large-scale deployment of Florence would depend on whether manpower savings were worth the cost of the robots - which has yet to be determined. 

AH Media ReleaseMedia ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CIH News
22
Nov
2022

The average life expectancy has increased – how can we age healthily?

Mediacorp News

Dr Guan Shou Ping, Senior Research Assistant at National University Health System, Centre for Healthy Longevity, speaks about healthy ageing on a Chinese radio talk show. 

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CHL News
8
Sep
2022

New clinic looks at how to slow ageing, prolong disease-free years

The Straits Times © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

A new longevity clinic, where the doctor will diagnose a healthy person's biological age and then provide a customised plan to slow ageing, is being set up at Alexandra Hospital (AH) and is slated to open by January next year. Professor Andrea Maier, the co-director of the National University Health System (NUHS) Centre for Healthy Longevity (CHL), said this at CHL's opening on Wednesday.

To measure biological age, a patient will undergo blood tests as well as a series of other tests to check his heart function, lung function, joints and more. The doctors will then prescribe a personalised plan which can include specific exercise routines and dietary modifications, said Prof Maier.

Professor Brian Kennedy, CHL director, said the centre, located in AH and a laboratory at NUS Medicine, integrates pre-clinical and clinical research to test ways of slowing ageing in a Southeast Asian population. The centre has screening tools that analyse facial ageing and measure arterial stiffness, body composition and functional ability.

The centre's mission is to enhance health span by three to five years in Singapore's population by slowing biological ageing.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsAH in the NewsCoE CHL News
1
Sep
2022

Old is gold: How healthy ageing can turn things around for greying societies

Others

​GovInsider noted the U.S. National Academy of Medicine's Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity seeks to provide a blueprint for guiding societies through the challenges and opportunities as the proportion of older people continues to grow. The article highlighted comments by the speakers at the summit co-hosted by the National University Health System, Ministry of Health, National University of Singapore, and Tsao Foundation. 

Prof Linda Fried, Dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, who co-chaired the Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity report, shared that a real transformative vision is needed to create a world for longer lives. Prof John Eu-Li Wong, Senior Advisor at National University Health System, and Senior Vice President of Health Innovation and Translation at National University of Singapore, added that "there is a whole science in learning for older people that really needs to be developed".

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CHL News
31
Aug
2022

How wearable, no-prick glucose monitors are changing the way diabetics manage their blood sugar levels

Channel NewsAsia

Prof Tai E Shyong, Director of National University Health System Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management, commented on the use of wearable for monitoring blood sugar level.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CDPM News
30
Aug
2022

增肌强肌要趁早 饮食运动双管齐下 (Strengthening muscles should start early through diet and exercise)

联合早报 © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

Prof Andrea Maier, Co-Director of the National University Health System, Centre for Healthy Longevity, pointed out that lack of regular exercise is the "most significant obstacle" preventing Singaporeans from attaining healthy muscles. Loss of appetite, reduced sense of taste, and difficulty chewing and swallowing could also occur with age, making it difficult to get sufficient essential nutrients, which could affect muscle mass and health. She emphasised that muscle mass does decrease with age, but the rate of loss could be slowed. Improving and refining one’s nutrient intake, as well as regular exercise can help to build and strengthen muscles effectively.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CHL News
26
Aug
2022

Critical for societies to unlock ‘longevity dividend’: DPM Heng

The Straits Times © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

Extensive media coverage of the first dissemination summit on the United States of America, National Academy of Medicine (NAM)'s Global Roadmap for Health Longevity Report – Implementation in Asia held at the National University Health System on 25 August, highlighted remarks by Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat and experts including Prof John Eu-Li Wong, Senior Advisor to National University Health System. In his opening address, Deputy Prime Minister Heng said that in order to better unleash the potential of people to contribute as they age, it is critical to unlock the "longevity dividend", which will in turn benefit people of all ages and societies around the globe.

The roadmap published in June 2022, is the result of three years' work by an international commission of experts from multiple domains to envision a world where people live longer lives, and how they can best do so through a whole-of society approach. 

 Dr Victor Dzau, President of NAM, said that if countries do not make changes to seize the opportunity that come with longer lives, they could face higher fiscal burdens, lower gross domestic product, and have more people living with poor health and being dependent on others. 

Prof John Eu-Li Wong, Senior Advisor, National University Health System and Senior Vice President of Health Innovation and Translation, National University of Singapore and Co-Chair of the Commission for a Global Roadmap for Healthy Longevity, USA NAM, shared the example of good housing, which is affordable and safe, with no step entry, wide doors and switches, and outlets at easily reachable heights. 

Prof Linda Fried, Dean of the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, who co-chaired the report with Prof Wong, said designing for older adults often results in better design for all ages. She added that the money spent on keeping them healthy reaps huge rewards.  She shared that delaying the onset of chronic conditions by one year is estimated to be worth US$37 trillion in the US alone. 

Other experts, which include Prof Zhao Yaohui from China Centre for Economic Research at Peking University, and Prof Hiroki Nakatani from Keio University, spoke virtually at the Summit.  

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE CHL News
25
Aug
2022

Singapore to host summit on global roadmap for healthy longevity

National University Health System

NUHS Media ReleaseCoE CHL News
1
Jul
2022

Youth Mental Health-New toolkit aims to help the young overcome stressors

Mediacorp News

​The Mind Science Centre under the National University Health System (NUHS) launched the Singapore Youth Resilience Scale (SYRESS) on 1 July, and it was included in the "Raising a resilient child" self-help handbook written by clinical psychologists. The guide book contains frequently asked questions as well as scenarios and strategies parents can use in their daily interaction with youths. These resources were launch alongside an exhibition by the Mind Science Centre that aims to destigmatize mental health among youths. Artworks by a commissioned artist and 16 primary and secondary school students are among the items on display. SMS Dr Janil Puthucheary, the Chair of the Interagency Taskforce on Mental Health and Well-being and who is also the Senior Minister of State for Communications and Information, and Health, opened the exhibition. The exhibition is located at MAELab on level 2 of Block 29 of Alexandra Hospital and will be displayed from 1 July 2022 to 31 October 2022. It is open for public booking by appointment only via pcmv11@visitor.nus.edu.sg.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE MSC News
14
Jun
2022

长寿养生不养病 (Longevity with health, not illnesses)

联合早报 © SPH Media Limited. Reproduced with permission

​A 2019 survey revealed that Singapore had one of the highest life expectancies in the world, with a life expectancy of 81.4 years and 85.7 years for men and women respectively. However, the healthy life expectancy (HALE) was 75.2 years and 73.7 years respectively. This meant that people lived longer, but the quality of life declined, with both men and women suffering from diseases for the last six to 12 years of their lives and having to struggle with their health.

Professor Brian Kennedy, director of the National University Health System Centre for Healthy Longevity, shared that many healthcare systems around the world focused on "illness" rather than the maintenance of health. He believed that healthcare should refocus on helping people maintain their health, by slowing down or even reversing ageing. The key would be to allow HALE to grow faster than life expectancy, which would reduce morbidity rates, improve quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs.


NUHS in the NewsCoE CHL NewsMedia Articles
10
Jun
2022

Ageing with Dignity

Channel NewsAsia

Ageing with dignity is a subject that's current and relevant in the context of Singapore's ageing population. Prof Kua Ee Heok, Vice Chairman of National University Health System Mind Science Centre and Editor of the book, 'Ageing with Dignity', shared more about who will benefit from reading this book and how useful the book will be for readers. He also discussed the Mind Science Centre's Age Well Everyday programme and how the programme is being refreshed.

NUHS in the NewsCoE MSC NewsMedia Articles
1
Jun
2022

传授正念天天康龄 (Imparting mindfulness to age well every day)

联合早报 © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Zaobao featured Mrs Wee Geok Hua, a volunteer instructor who teaches mindfulness in the NUHS Mind Science Centre's (MSC) Age Well Everyday (AWE) programme. The AWE programme is one of MSC's signature programmes aimed at preventing dementia and depression.

Mrs Wee is responsible for leading AWE participants to conduct mindfulness to mediate their emotions and improve daily behaviour and attitude. She pointed out that mindfulness practice originated from Eastern thinking, but many teaching materials were from the West, thus localisation adjustments must be made to suit the cultural background and language habits of Singaporean seniors.

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE MSC News
21
May
2022

About 1 in 3 young people in Singapore has mental health symptoms: Study

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Associate Professor John Wong, Senior Consultant, Department of Psychological Medicine, National University Hospital and Director of National University Health System Mind Science Centre, noted that there has been an increasing number of youth, especially those from secondary school, who have been seeking help from professional services. He noted that it is challenging that their parents, who may not have the equivalent level of mental health literacy, are "very resistant or very hesitant". A/Prof Wong called for mental health education for the population at large.

Led by A/Prof Wong, the Singapore Youth Epidemiology and Resilience Study mainly explored the incidence of mental illness and emotional resilience in adolescents in 2020 to March 2022. The research project, which interviewed 3,336 young people aged 11 to 18, found that anxiety and depressive symptoms peak between the ages of 14 and 16, which suggested that this age group needed closer attention, and relevant mental health services could also be more targeted to support them.


NUH in the NewsNUHS in the NewsCoE MSC NewsMedia Articles
8
May
2022

New book highlights nationwide dementia prevention effort

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

Senior Minister Teo Chee Hean officiated the launch of the book, Ageing With Dignity, on 8 May 2022. The book was published by the National University Health System Mind Science Centre (MSC) and written by researchers and volunteers of MSC's Age Well Everyday (AWE) programme.

The AWE is a dementia prevention programme, mooted by Mr Teo's late wife Mrs Teo Poh Yim, that combines health education, art, music, horticultural therapy and physical activities. It has led to the training of more than 110 volunteers to reach out to more elderly people, and more than 3,000 seniors have benefitted from it.

In his speech at the launch, Mr Teo said: "The AWE programme is designed to delay cognitive deterioration, reduce anxiety and increase sociability, and in so doing, help to delay the onset of dementia and improve the quality of life of seniors." He added that he and his family are honoured that the book has been dedicated in the memory of Mrs Teo.

On the significance of the book, editor Professor Kua Ee Heok said: "There's a lot of negativity about ageing. Some may think that old people are a burden to society. But what we want people to know is that old people play a big part in the country. So a sense of dignity for them is so important."

Media ArticlesNUHS in the NewsCoE MSC News
9
Mar
2022

Sow the seeds of health. Gardening for mental health and resilience

The Straits Times © Singapore Press Holdings Limited. Reproduced with permission

According to a Singapore-based study conducted by National Parks Board (NParks) and the Department of Psychological Medicine at NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, simply viewing a purpose-built therapeutic garden can improve mood and supplement treatment for depression. The Straits Times also mentioned that a study by researchers from NParks and National University Health System Mind Science Centre found that people who spent time gardening in Singapore during the pandemic reported higher levels of mental resilience compared with those who did not.

NUHS in the NewsCoE MSC NewsMedia Articles
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